Universiteit Leiden

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Programme

This honours college offers a three year, 30 EC package for students entering the programme in the first BA year, and a two year, 30 EC package for those entering in the second BA year.

A combination of didactical principles is used to reach the aims of the programme: lectures, workshops, case study sessions, simulations, field trips, guest speakers,  assignments, personal and leadership development conversations, HC Internships and Individual Projects. All activities serve to connect theory and practice.

 Year 1: 5 EC

Tackling Personal Challenges

Semester 2

•Crucial Skills ( 5EC)

•Negotiation Lab (5 EC)

 

 

 

Year 2: 15 EC

Exploring Global Challenges

Semester 1

•Governing Science, Society and Expertise (5 EC)

•Crucial Skills  (5 EC)

•The early Silk roads: Archaeology & Global Networks (5EC)

 

 

Semester 2

• Living with Water Scarcity (5 EC)

• Attacking Global Problems at EU level ( 5 EC)

• Public Leadership (5 EC)

 

Semester 1 or 2

• LUC or Honours Class (5 EC, mandatory)

 

 

Year 3: 5 EC

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year 1, 2 or 3: 5 EC

Tackling Global Challenges on a local level

Semester 2

• Wicked Problems Lab ( 5 EC)

 

 

Expertise in Practice

• Honours Internship (5 EC)

• Honours Individual Project (5EC)

 

 

YEAR BA1 semester 2:  TACKLING PERSONAL CHALLENGES

Crucial Skills

“Many great ideas have been lost because the people who had them could not stand being laughed at.”  

---Anon

This course trains to become an effective 21e century skills professional. The course will make you more effective in making decisions and getting things done through an investigation of those values, assumptions and habits that will strengthen your empathetic, ethical and expressive qualities. The first part of each class focuses on analytical, ethical, and empathetic reflection, while the second part builds professional and personal skills. To be effective in school, work and private life, students must be able to activate a range of functional skills, such as project planning and financial management, as well as personal skills, such as creative thinking, presenting, listening and negotiating. These skills will help you to navigate the complexities of life.

Goal

  • Practice a growth mindset by identifying continuous potential for personal development
  • Examine core values and identify a personal mission statement
  • Recognize the way that communication and presentation are mutually inclusive
  • Apply personal and theoretical reflection in writing
  • Practice how to generate new perspectives on conventional wisdom to discover possibilities, creative thinking
  • Connect traditional to new notions of (entrepreneurial) value

Negotiation LAB

Changes in society, the global economy, and ways people work have made negotiating skills more important than ever. The challenges are legion:dealing with history’s most diverse work force, doing business with customers who tell you how to run your business, negotiating with foreign counterparts—and more. These are not just issues of corporate concern; they are also of increasing importance to your personal success.

By participating in this course you will come to recognize the pervasiveness and importance of negotiation. You will acquire a new repertoire of negotiating skills in a variety of different conflict settings. You will develop a systematic and positive approach to negotiating with colleagues, bosses, clients, other stakeholders, and external groups of all kinds—in ways that equip you to deal also with all kinds of conditions and circumstances.

This is an interactive course based on the idea that becoming skilled at negotiation is best achieved through practicing it. Therefore this course contains simulation games and negotiation exercises where you can practice your negotiation and leadership skills in a safe environment on your fellow students. The exercises will be combined with reflection, discussion, readings, assignments and presentations to connect theory and practice and enhance the overall learning.

Goal

This course aims to help you develop the negotiating skills needed to meet the challenges facing today’s world. The course integrates the experiential and intellectual components of negotiation, and will help you

  • develop the sophistication to analyze bargaining and conflict relationships
  • to learn (through class discussion, peer feedback and self-assessment) about your own individual conflict management style;
  • gain advanced knowledge and insights about negotiation and related organizational behavior and apply this theoretical knowledge to challenges in the real world;
  • prepare effectively for negotiation;
  • understand when to negotiate, and when not to negotiate, when to reach a deal and when to walk away;
  • negotiate effectively in teams or with multiple opponents;
  • apply multiple approaches to resolving unproductive negotiations;
  • understand how to create value and reach mutually beneficial agreements;
  • and to increase your confidence in your negotiation skills

YEAR BA2 semester 1:  EXPLORING GLOBAL CHALLENGES

Governing Science, Society and Expertise

This course introduces students to the sometimes tense relationship between politics, society and experts. The class shows the different ways in which problems and issues in society, business and politics are identified, how they can be addressed, and how students may orient themselves on advising on such problems and issues in their future career. Throughout the course students are made aware of scientific ‘lenses’ on reality to get a sharp analytical view on problems and issues, and what it means when we speak about ‘innovation’ in science and research for addressing problems in the real world. The course will further include a simulation game to experience the interplay of government, research, non-governmental stakeholders and society.

Goal

The goal of the course is to get a sense of how politics, science and society are connected regarding today’s global challenges and what role expertise, money and power can play in these dynamics. The course introduces students to a variety of lenses and enhances critical and analytical thinking with tools from different disciplines. These skills will be put to use during the simulation game at the end of the course.

Crucial Skills

“Many great ideas have been lost because the people who had them could not stand being laughed at.”  

---Anon

This course trains to become an effective 21e century skills professional. The course will make you more effective in making decisions and getting things done through an investigation of those values, assumptions and habits that will strengthen your empathetic, ethical and expressive qualities. The first part of each class focuses on analytical, ethical, and empathetic reflection, while the second part builds professional and personal skills. To be effective in school, work and private life, students must be able to activate a range of functional skills, such as project planning and financial management, as well as personal skills, such as creative thinking, presenting, listening and negotiating. These skills will help you to navigate the complexities of life.

Goal

  • Practice a growth mindset by identifying continuous potential for personal development
  • Examine core values and identify a personal mission statement
  • Recognize the way that communication and presentation are mutually inclusive
  • Apply personal and theoretical reflection in writing
  • Practice how to generate new perspectives on conventional wisdom to discover possibilities, creative thinking
  • Connect traditional to new notions of (entrepreneurial) value

The Early Silk Roads: Archaeology & Global Networks

The course uses the most up-to-date archaeological research of the early Silk Roads networks across the Eurasian continent (200 BCE-600 CE) in order to rethink and discuss the connectedness of our present globalising world. The lectures offer an overview of the most important historical and archaeological contexts of the Silk Roads, ranging from ancient Egypt to Han Dynasty China. In-depth case study are discussed of specific sites, such as Berenike (Egypt), Petra (Jordan), Arikamedu (India), the Karakorum mountains (Pakistan), and the Tarim Basin (Xinjiang, China).
Subsequently, based on these case studies, each lecture uses the archaeological facts to incite debate about present global connections. Herein, three main focus points are central:

- The issue of traditional centre-periphery/West-East dichotomies
- Objects as globetrotters vs. human migrations
- Cultural heritage challenges for both archaeology and politics       


By means of 5 written assignments, students will develop archaeological analytical skills for individual objects, and are encouraged to interpret archaeological data in a much wider socio-political context. Feedback on all assignment will be provided during this process.Throughout the course, students are challenged to think outside the box and consider the lasting connections between past and present. Moreover, they are encouraged to develop their academic skills through debate, empirical analysis, and essay writing.

Goal

  • To gain knowledge about archaeological data from the earliest trade networks of the Silk Roads;
  • To connect past and present by using informed historical knowledge to interpret and better understand current world connections;
  • To enhance student’s skills in academic discussion and essay writing;

YEAR BA2 SEMESTER 2:  EXPLORING GLOBAL CHALLENGES

Attacking Global Problems at EU level

The focus of this course will be on the way the EU attacks global problems. In this module the two central policy areas are (1) Asylum and Migration policies and (2) the Common Foreign and Security Policy of the EU. These policy areas will be taught by academic lecturers of Leiden University and experts from ministries and the national rapporteur on trafficking in human beings. The last part of the  module will prepare for the “Grande Finale” of the module, a EU simulation game in which all students will represent a minister of a EU

member state and were they need to come to a compromise text by that is acceptable for all delegations.

Goal

When students have successfully participated in this module, they:

  • Understand the formal and informal rules on the European level
  • Understand the development of vision at EU level
  • Have experienced the way of working in het EU policymaking arena.
  • Are able to independently analyze issues, critically examine books and research reports in scientific journals
  • Are able to write a review about a scientific book,
  • Are able to contribute one’s own insights in a clear and structured manner both orally and in writing

Living with Water Scarcity

Around the world, more countries and communities face increasing scarcity of clean water, which leads to economic, environmental, social and political dilemmas. In this course, we will explore the definitions of scarcity and shortage, the market and non-market costs of scarcity, and different means of addressing scarcity. We will also discuss how politics, culture and climate disruption interact with existing policies regarding water use. (Note that the Netherlands is often seen as possessing abundant water, but it is subject to both scarcity (droughts) and abundance shocks (floods), so all of these ideas apply here as elsewhere.)

Each of the 6 lectures will focus on 1 or 2 areas that scarcity affects, e.g., agriculture & industry, environment, rich & poor. Each of the 4 excursions outside the classroom will reinforce our class discussions with real-world examples.Students will be expected to participate in class discussions and on-line debates. They will also make a presentation and write a course paper on a water-related topic of their choice.

 

Goal

  • Students will be able to recognize scarcity, explain how behaviour and/or policies affects scarcity, and estimate the economic and social damages resulting from scarcity.
  • Students will use interdisciplinary perspectives to explain the various dimensions and impacts of scarcity.

Public Leadership

Who is the public leader? Is it the one that works for the government, or the entrepreneur around the corner who is making a difference for society through his business? Or is it the student who uses a fresh perspective on society? Public leadership no longer fits in the traditional management schemes or in hierarchy; public leadership is all about you!

Leadership is something that every one of us can show. By a particular expertise, a great initiative, a big portion of engagement and perseverance. It is not depending on any formal position in an organization, but rather on your capacities and the momentum to set things in motion, together with others. You know how to mobilize others and how to make use of the contemporary means and (social) media to build a network and to get your message exposed.

Public leadership is not just about the public sector; it is about achieving something for society, for a better world. Borders between public and private are fading, and perhaps even trivial. As a public leader you know how to make a difference, even with small things.

In this course you will work on making a connection between the theory and practice of public leadership, explore what the concept is and how you can develop your own leadership competences. Together with others you will work in assignments in both public and private organizations and learn to reflect on leadership.

Goal

  • To develop knowledge about the various approaches in the literature to (public) leadership
  • To develop insights into the various applications of (public) leadership in practice and to reflect on these
  • To develop and apply leadership competences to contribute to public goals

YEAR BA3 semester 2:   TACKLING GLOBAL CHALLENGES ON A LOCAL LEVEL

 

Wicked Problems LAB with an assignment

Wicked problems are, essentially, ‘wild problems’; unlike our, relatively tame, day to day problems they defy clear definition, there is a complex interplay of forces that cause the problem in the first place and – because of that – there is no consensus as regards a problem solving strategy. Tackling wicked problems therefore requires another mindset that solving tame problems: A mindset not so much aimed at finding the best possible solution, but at what can be best described ‘muddling through’. By that we mean learning about the problem as well as possible solutions as you go along, an understanding what it means for the problem to be complex as well as a commitment to go along in a morally responsible manner.  The Wicked Problems Lab is devoted to helping students acquire this mindset. During the lab, we will study theory on complexity and wicked problems and immediately apply that theory to develop a project on a real-world wicked problem. In this way we get a feel for what takes to be able to ‘muddle through’ when facing the wildest of problems.

 

Goal

When students have completed this course they will:

  • Understand what it means for social issues to be complex (i.e. wicked).
  • Understand why dealing with complexity requires a different way of thinking, i.e. non linear thinking.
  • Be knowledgeable of the most important insights around complexity and wicked problems from different scientific fields, including philosophy, political science, psychology and policy science.
  • Be able to analyze wicked problems and suggest ways to deal with them with respect to these problem’s complexity.
  • Understand and be able to use techniques and methods such as visualization, stakeholder analysis, integrative negotiation, framing / reframing and their relation to wicked problems.
  • Be able to give policy advice to real-world policy makers on the wicked problems they struggle with based on research and literature.
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